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And Now the Good News

Marathons are all about good news, though if you tell me that at three o’clock on the 24th April I may disagree. But, on a fundamental level, the marathon’s origins are more about the telling of good news than they are about athletics. In September 490BC, Pheidippides burst into the assembly in Athens, informed the gathered leaders that their army had defeated the Persians at Marathon, and then promptly collapsed and died. He had ran from the battle with one job — to be a messenger of the good news. The marathon was born. People run marathons for many reasons, some for...
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Here Now

I love the way old cameras work. I’ve a beautiful vintage Olympus film camera at home; there are no menus, buttons, or screens, and everything is adjusted by rotating the lens in different places. Each section of lens has a different texture and the whole experience of photography becomes very tactile. As you rotate the lens, you can watch as the world seen through the viewfinder goes from blurry and out of focus to suddenly become crystal clear. I had a moment like this during the worship at church on Sunday morning, a moment where everything seems to click into place...
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Reflections along the way

I’ll never forget walking up to Hősök tere, Heroes’ Square, at about ten thirty on my last night in Budapest. In 1989, 250,000 people had gathered in the square for the reburial of Imre Nagy – alongside the heroic Pál Maléter and others – but that night I found myself alone amidst the indescribable beauty and grandeur of the millennium monument and its colonnades. I wandered to the middle of the square, exactly central, sat cross legged on the ground and relaxed; a lone rollerblader glided gracefully by and circled the monuments, as if sent by some benevolent choreographer to perform a silent ballet and add to the...
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Forever Grateful

I’ve come to realise, in recent months, that I’m quite the expert on the subject of eternal gratitude. The realisation came to me while driving. I had pulled over to allow another car to pass and they passed without a wave, a little flash of the headlights, a wiggle of the indicators, or even so much as a precursory glance in my direction. Naturally I was furious; surely an appropriate response would have been for them to acknowledge my kindness, maybe look up my address online and send a gift hamper, or have their first born cycle eternally in front of my...
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Centre of the universe…

1543. The Renaissance was transforming the way people thought about both art and science, and Nicolaus Copernicus published a book called De revolutionibus orbium coelestium. On the revolution of the celestial spheres. Why is this relevant? Copernicus was one of the first humans ever to realise that the whole world didn’t revolve around him. To the most learned and educated minds in the world, for thousands of years, we were the centre of the universe. Galileo Galillei was called a heretic for furthering Copernicus’s theory and teaching it, but I think he did us a great favour. In his own...
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